Single Parenthood and Children’s Well-being

fis02_240x240About half of all children born today are expected to spend some time in a single parent family before reaching age 18. Recent evidence suggests that children from single parent families do less well, on average, than children who live with both of their parents. These findings do not mean that every child growing up in a single parent family will do worse than a similarly-situated child in a two-parent family. What these findings do mean is that single parenthood increases the odds or the risk that children’s well-being will suffer.

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Presentations

The Family Structure of Children in Wisconsin

by Tom Kaplan
Associate Director of the Institute for Research on Poverty, University of Wisconsin-Madison


Why We Should Be Concerned About Single Parenthood

by Gary Sandefur
Professor of Sociology and Affiliate, Center for Demography & Ecology and the Institute for Research on Poverty, University of Wisconsin-Madison


Promoting Children’s Well-being by Strengthening Families

by Hamilton McCubbin
CEO, Kamehameha Schools/Bishop Estate


Improving the Economic Security of Single Parent Families

by Daniel Meyer
Professor at the School of Social Work and Affiliate of the Institute for Research on Poverty, University of Wisconsin-Madison


Additional Materials

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